Home Headlines Sweet revenge for bitter sugar Mama

Sweet revenge for bitter sugar Mama

788
0
Sweet revenge for bitter sugar Mama
RELIEVED: Israel will receive her dues

Ben 10 to pay after love affair turns sour!

Four years after her love affair turned rotten, scorned sugar mummy Gasenone Israel, 48, has 132, 250 reasons to smile again.

This was the amount that Gaborone High Court ordered 38-year-old ‘Ben 10’ Jacob Marapo to compensate his mature former lover.

Marapo, who swindled a fortune from Israel during their two-year romance, was found to be a liar by the court and told to pay back ‘what he fraudulently obtained’ from his ex-girlfriend.

“I have found him difficult to believe as a witness and I must hold on the probabilities that the plaintiff (Israel) has made out her case,” ruled Judge Godfrey Radijeng during last Thursday’s judgement.

Israel dragged her former cohabiting partner to court in June for the recovery of numerous loans she had advanced to him during their love relationship, which started in 2012 when Israel was still married.

On account of the apparent contradiction in his plea compared to his evidence-in-chief, the court doubted Marapo’s testimony, noting that he originally pleaded to being given the money as ‘love gifts’ but later denied receiving the cash at all.

Outlining her claims – a long, detailed list, varying in amounts from P50, 000 to P100 – Israel told court her ex- lover was an extremely untrustworthy person who used her financially and then refused to pay her back.

She further maintained that during their time together, Marapo never paid for anything.

“All he ever brought home was an onion, a tomato and P15 worth of meat from Choppies store,” an irate Israel had told court during an earlier appearance.

Sweet revenge for bitter sugar Mama

Her demands date back to May 2012, when she lent Marapo P50, 000, having taken out a P150, 000 bank loan herself. According to Israel, Marapo had told her he wanted to deposit it in his account so that he could qualify for P250, 000, which he said he was going to use to open a business.

It proved to be an expensive month for Israel.

A few days later she advanced her young lothario with a further P20, 000 after Marapo told her he urgently needed to hire a truck as he had won a tender to transport goods to Zimbabwe.

A depressing trend was to follow.

Apparently blinded by love, the smitten older woman loaned her lover an extra P10, 000 the following month.

On 18 July 2012 it was P40, 00, with Israel explaining that this time Marapo had taken her to a construction site in Broadhurst, Gaborone where he “appeared to be negotiating something with the Chinese nationals in charge of the site.

“He told me he wanted to purchase a JCB to be used to generate funds, which would repay the loans.”

Gasenone testified that by this point, in order to reassure herself, she had wanted to go with Marapo to see where he was ‘taking the money’, as she no longer trusted him.

However, he refused, saying, “It was a man’s deal.”

Despite her growing doubt, Israel continued to lend her lover cash in 2013, although by then the loans had significantly deceased in amount.

In January, she lent Marapo P2, 900 – money she had intended to pay her children’s school fees with.

Israel explained that Marapo said he would use the cash to join a loan scheme ‘motshelo’ which he was invited to by his brother. She said he promised to pay back once the scheme allowed him to draw money around May or June, same year.

Further loans followed, the kind-hearted Israel seemingly incapable of saying no to her man.

The romance came to an abrupt end in June 2014, when Marapo left Israel’s house, telling her he was going to attend a traditional wedding.

He never came back.

Indeed, in his defence, Marapo argued that Israel only made the claim because she was bitter he had walked out on her.

However, his argument failed to convince the court, much to Israel’s delight.

Expressing her relief after her victory, an ecstatic Israel told The Voice, “All I wanted was for him to pay back my money. I feel relieved now that the judge has vindicated me. I was a victim of a fraudster.

“He had fooled me, but he could not fool the judiciary!”