Home Mom at Large STRENGTHENING THE COMMUNITY THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS

STRENGTHENING THE COMMUNITY THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS

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On Tuesday we attended an exciting meeting called by the ministry of  Education and Skills Development to launch a brilliant initiative  to bring the industry closer to the children’s education.

GRACE MUZILA: P.S ministry of education skills development

The way I see it, the  ‘Adopt a School’ programme, which aims at getting companies to choose a school of their liking and assist it in whichever way they can, is promising to be more than just a good way that companies can leverage their business through brand identity.

It’s an opportunity to change a life, be a role model and to contribute to the education of the youth in general. There was a lot of excitement as companies pledged and promised to jump on the bandwagon right away. And yes it can be done,and it will be done, hopefully it will be done right too, especially that the ministry seems to have a clear roadmap and strategy in place to implement the system for the long haul.

There was talk about adopting schools from as far as Kachikau  and Manxotai and some other obscure places like that, which is great.

But then as I mentioned to a friend from the ministry whom I got the pleasure of chatting with after the event, it would be nice to see companies and individuals targeting schools in their neighbourhoods as well before reaching far and away from home.

I guess I say this as I grapple with having to deal with the seemingly growing number of little delinquents and petty criminals who have come to terrorise their neighbourhoods, or definitely my neighbourhood here in the capital city.

I’m the first one to advocate for levelling the starting field for those children born in remote areas by providing them with access to resources, like tv sets and lap tops for example that some of  their more privileged counter parts in towns and cities might take for granted , but I think that on another level those children when it comes to being raised right are more privileged.
This is because at such village level ‘a child is raised by the whole village’ as they say in Setswana and therefore youngsters are more likely to grow up to be more well mannered than some of the ones I live with and interact with in G-West.

Recently I was shocked by the level of defiance I had to encounter when I came face to face with a 15- year- old G-West  standard seven pupil who snatched my bag and stole my phone. The young fellow, like another 15- year- old I found at the same police station  giving a statement to the police without his parents about how he was beaten black and blue by fellow students after school was not intimidated by the police station and men in uniform at all.

As much as these two kids amazed me, it was their unbelievable parents  who puzzled me the most. The mother to the one who snatched my phone confessed to having used the P300 airtime, which was in the phone, making me realise with utter disgust that as much as many of us  might want  to pass the blame, in many cases it is the parents’ fault that the Kids turn out to be the way they  are.

In the background of the above two incidents where parents seemed not to care to train their children to do the right thing, the questions I want to throw out to you dear readers for discussion are these:  Should parents be held responsible for their kids behaviour. And if yes, until the kid is how old should the parent be held responsible for what they do? Write in with your comments, suggestions and even questions to [email protected]

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Bragging versus making a point

Over a month after I wrote about the difference between bragging about your children, which some people find very annoying and simply expressing genuine excitement and making a point, responses are still pouring in on the subject.

This week a proud mother, Onalenna Sedimo wrote:

I just wanted to say there is absolutely nothing wrong with bragging about your son, even if you were not making any point, every parent has to be proud when their children are doing great, you don’t owe anyone an apology.

You are doing a great job as a mother, you can’t worry about what people think, they are probably guilty because they are not doing what they are supposed to be doing. People like bringing others down to make themselves feel better.

Keep reading for him and be proud!

Over a month after I wrote about the difference between bragging about your children, which some people find very annoying and simply expressing genuine excitement and making a point, responses are still pouring in on the subject.

This week a proud mother, Onalenna Sedimo wrote:

I just wanted to say there is absolutely nothing wrong with bragging about your son, even if you were not making any point, every parent has to be proud when their children are doing great, you don’t owe anyone an apology.

You are doing a great job as a mother, you can’t worry about what people think, they are probably guilty because they are not doing what they are supposed to be doing. People like bringing others down to make themselves feel better.

Keep reading for him and be proud!