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Sickening blue lies

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Sickening blue lies
CLEAR EVIDENCE: Soldiers beating up a civilian in Harare on August 1

This is what came to mind as I listened to former Home Affairs Minister, Obert Mpofu on Tuesday claiming that snipers were planted in Harare’s top buildings to shoot at civilians on August 1.

Mpofu was testifying before the Kgalema Motlanthe Commission, which was set up to probe the killing of six people following military intervention in post election violence.

While it is in the public domain that the six were fatally shot by the soldiers, Mpofu unashamedly claimed that the uniformed men had nothing to do with the massacre but that instead snipers were planted to do the evil deed to tarnish the image of the ruling party and the army.

We have been taken for fools many times by people in positions of power and have been told many lies but I must say this outlandish claim by Mpofu takes the trophy for 2018 porky pies.

For Mpofu to absolve the soldiers in such a clear case is sickening to say the least.

Lives were lost and those who lost their loved ones in this barbaric act are still grieving yet someone makes such irresponsible claims.

For him and his cronies, this appears to be just a political gimmick meant to tarnish Zanu PF’s image, yet people died. How pathetic of him!

While we are well aware that this commission was just set up to make it appear as though the powers that be are really concerned about the incident, the truth of the matter is that they are not the least bit bothered for they knew exactly what they were doing when they deployed armed soldiers onto the streets.

The commission was thus not necessary at all and was just a waste of money.

The truth, as already shown by Mpofu’s pitiable claim, will not prevail.

What we should instead expect is blaming of innocent people, after all history had taught us that Zanu PF and the government will never admit any wrong doing.

And while we continue putting up with lies from those in authority, our economic woes are also worsening as prices of commodities continue to go up.

What ‘killed’ me this week is the price of milk, which is now between $2.50 and $3.50 (P25.00 and P35.00) per litre!

My jaw dropped while in a shop as I just could not believe that consumers were expected to part with so much for milk.

I walked out, telling myself that until we start milking our own cows, I will not spend that much on milk, which is not a basic commodity anyway, unless of course if it becomes a matter of life and death.

I wonder how much it will cost next week and a whole lot of other things when fuel prices have also gone up.

The trend is that when fuel prices go up, everything else follows suit and with petrol and diesel prices set to go up again this weekend, people are already bracing themselves for even tougher times ahead.

13 COMMENTS

  1. This issue with this Commission of Inquiry it is not INDEPENDENT . SADC should have appointed the commission one can spot the errors with SADC – not rocket science this Chief Executive or someone or a group should have done it . If she leaves the headquarters she will get a golden handshake for being useless in her job like most African leaders.

  2. This is an article on Obert Mpofu who reportedly addressed himself as the “Obedient Son” to Mugabe to cover up his corrupt ways

    “Mpofu stalls $15bn diamond probe
    By newsday
    – February 23, 2018

    HOME Affairs Minister Obert Mpofu yesterday caused a storm in Parliament and divided legislators, as he refused to answer questions on mining issues and the alleged missing $15 billion diamond revenue.

    BY VENERANDA LANGA

    Tempers started to flare when Mpofu swore that he would not be grilled by the committee, as long as its chairperson, Temba Mliswa (Norton MP), presided over the meeting.

    The former Mines minister claimed Mliswa was fighting a personal vendetta, saying the Norton MP once drove 600km to his home to discuss issues with him.
    It was not clear if Mpofu was trying to avoid giving answers on allegations made earlier on by businessman, Lovemore Kurotwi that he had solicited for a $10 million bribe from him in order for the Mines ministry to allow his company, Canadile Miners, to extract diamonds from Chiadzwa.

    Kurotwi, who had appeared before the Mines committee earlier, described Mpofu as “corrupt” like the deposed President Robert Mugabe.

    The businessman said Mugabe could have been part of the problem as he failed to take any action against Mpofu, after he wrote to him detailing

    how his then Mines minister had demanded a $10 million bribe from him and his foreign partners, Yeuda Litch and Subithry Naidoo.

    “Mugabe was complicit, from the way he supported the corrupt tendencies of Mpofu, I would say he is corrupt,” Kurotwi said.

    The businessman said when he refused to pay the $10 million bribe, Mpofu then hit back by pulling his company out of Chiadzwa and confiscating his equipment, which is now being used by the Zimbabwe Mining Development Corporation, while his 1,7 million carats of diamonds worth around $150 million were confiscated by the State.

    Mpofu reportedly went further and got Kurotwi arrested on allegations that he had lied to the government that he would bring in diamond investment worth $2 billion.

    He also allegedly roped in former ZMDC chairperson, Goodwills Masimirembwa and lawyer, Farai Mutamangira, to investigate him instead of engaging the police and Zimbabwe Anti-Corruption Commission.

    Mutamangira was said to have been paid close to $1 million for his services.

    The ZMDC board, which also appeared before the committee, disclosed that over a period of six years, the government only got $189 million from diamonds.
    But in 2009, Mpofu had bragged in Namibia that the country was expecting $2 billion in diamond revenue.

    When Mpofu appeared before the committee after Kurotwi, the minister seemed angry and gave snide remarks to MPs when they tried to instruct him on the proceedings.

    Mpofu told the legislators they could not lecture him on Parliament, as he has been a legislator since 1997.

    Asked by Musikavanhu MP Prosper Mutseyami to withdraw the statement, Mpofu responded: “I am not going to withdraw because I have not taken an oath before the committee.”

    Mliswa replied: “We expect leaders like you to respect other MPs.”

    Mpofu later addressed Mliswa as “comrade” instead of “honourable” and the issue caused another storm.

    Mpofu said he was angry because the committee had not sent him a formal invitation to appear before them, adding that he had read it from newspapers.

    He said as former Mines minister, he could not take questions for a ministry that he no longer presided over.

    “I have no mandate to speak for the ministry of Mines and you must be aware of that comrade,” Mpofu said

    “I have been abused by the chairman (Mliswa), who has been saying things in public, attacking me and maligning me.

    “I have been attacked by the chairman in the papers, where he has called me names, yet he nicodemously comes to my house in the cover of the night to talk about things.

    “I live 600km from here.”

    Mliswa denied the claims, saying he only visited Mpofu’s home to discuss Zanu PF issues pertaining to the fallout with former secretary for administration, Didymus Mutasa, and not diamond issues.

    He said Mpofu was trying to mislead Parliament.

    Mpofu responded: “For as long as he (Mliswa) is sitting in front of me presiding on this issue, I will not co-operate.”

    As Mpofu continued to refuse to take questions from MPs, Zanu PF legislators, Masango Matambanadzo (Kwekwe Central) and Dexter Nduna (Chegutu West) began to defend him.

    This resulted in MPs shouting and pointing fingers at each other.

    Mpofu asked to be excused for a few minutes claiming that he wanted to wash his hands.

    When he returned, he stuck to his guns, saying: “I will never, ever be presided over by Mliswa.”

    Mliswa responded: “You know why you are avoiding me because I deal with facts. You will not get away with murder.”

    Mpofu then accused Mliswa of threatening him.

    “I have never seen such an unprofessional chairperson.

    “(The late former chairperson of the Mines Portfolio Committee) Edward Chindori Chininga and (former Mines Committee chairperson) Daniel Shumba were professional and never behaved like this,” he said.

    This further irked the legislators, who warned Mpofu he could be charged with contempt of Parliament.

    Seeing that the meeting had degenerated into complete chaos, Mliswa then sent MPs for a lunch break and ordered Mpofu to appear before the committee in the afternoon.

    Mpofu then went out shouting: “I am not coming back. I will only come when you invite me formally. You want to abuse me.”

    He did not return.

    Mliswa said the committee would now prepare a report on Mpofu’s behaviour to be handed over to the Speaker of the National Assembly, Jacob Mudenda.

    He said Mpofu would be allowed to give his side of the story and reasons why he did not want Mliswa to preside over the meeting.”

  3. Most of the people appearing at this Inquiry that was not INDEPENDENT from Government would have failed the Lie Detector test ?

  4. Thre is never a commenbt from the people who run SADC about this Commission Of Inquiry that should have in realstic terms be appointed by those running SADC they seem to have a tendency of sweeing everything under the carpets which is equivalent to dishonesty – Questions need to be raised about those who are running SADC The Chief Executive seems to align herself with those in leadership of the countries and not engaging with others . If one needs to get a bigger picture who have to listen to BOTH SIDES the RULING and the OPPOSITION including MEMBERS OF CIVIL SOCIETY and ORDINARY CITIZENS does she have to be told how to do her job??

  5. This is a recent Article about refugees from other countries this region is like a war zone and it indicates the instability and how it is affecting the ordinary peope land one would expect an Organisation like SADC also to be seen to be doing something about REFUGEES but they seem very ADAMANT by turning a blind eye to them – It is like a VICIOUS CYCLE for these refugees who are the ORDINARY CITIZENS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTRIES are entering a country that is facing many problems

    “Southern Africa: Zimbabwe Battles Influx of Congolese, Mozambique Refugees
    By Danai Mwarumba

    Harare — Zimbabwe, besieged by cholera and economic challenges, is battling a surge of asylum seekers from neighbouring Mozambique and crisis-torn Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

    Some 1 382 asylum seekers, largely Congolese, have arrived in the current year.

    A significant number of these vulnerable members of the community are fleeing the ceaseless conflict in DRC ahead of elections later this month. Those from Mozambique are escaping intermittent clashes perpetrated by opposition militants.

    The latest arrivals bring to 13 864 registered refugees, asylum seekers and so-called persons of concern in economically-struggling Zimbabwe.

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has raised concern at the lack of access to shelter, which remains a challenge due to funding constraints and increasing refugee population in the Tongogara Refugee Camp near Chipinge, some 400 kilometres southeast of the capital Harare.

    Meanwhile, an ongoing cholera outbreak has led to the postponement of an exercise to verify the population of refugees, asylum seekers and persons of concern.

    The postponement follows the restriction on public gatherings by authorities in the eastern province of Manicaland, which borders Mozambique.

    “UNHCR will engage the authorities to put in measures to allow for the exercise to proceed,” a spokesperson said.

    The UN agency also lamented the lack of class rooms and teachers at schools around Tongogara, which impacts on refugees and asylum-seekers’ access to high school education.

    Ironically, thousands of Zimbabweans are asylum seekers and refugees mostly in South Africa after fleeing years of political crisis and economic decline.

    Read the original article on CAJ News.”

  6. And this is what Niger is doing about those fleeing their countries because of conflicts

    “Africa: Niger Adopts Law to Protect Displaced People in First for Africa
    share
    “Dakar — Niger has adopted Africa’s first national law for the protection and assistance of people fleeing violence, floods and droughts, the government and United Nations said on Thursday.
    The government says there are about 174,000 displaced people in the West African country, mostly in regions where Islamist violence has spilled over from Mali and Nigeria.
    That figure excludes others who were forced to leave their homes to search for grazing land or water, said Lawan Magagi, Niger’s minister of humanitarian action and disaster management.

    “The question of sustainable solutions has really guided us … because internal displacement in Niger is becoming more and more recurrent,” Magagi told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

    This is due to both climate change and conflicts in neighbouring countries that affect border communities, he said.

    The new law was approved unanimously by the national assembly on Monday, Magagi said.

    It is based on the Kampala Convention, a 2009 African Union treaty that establishes guiding principles for protection of internally displaced persons (IDPs).
    Other African countries have ratified the Kampala Convention, but not incorporated it into national law, according to the U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR).

    “Niger continues to inspire and show its solidarity and generosity towards those forced to flee,” said Alessandra Morelli, UNHCR representative in Niger. Magagi said the law would allow for a national fund to help IDPs and increase penalties for assaults on them.

    The state will also play a bigger role in preventing land disputes when people are forced to move, and will help them return home if the situation has improved, he said.

    “In general, it’s refugees who are supported most by partners. But the population of a country that flees within the country doesn’t have access to as much assistance,” he said.
    Niger hosts about 176,000 refugees, mostly from the part of Nigeria battling Boko Haram, according to UNHCR.
    The country has also opened its doors to vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers imprisoned in Libya while trying to reach Europe.

    The United Nations has evacuated more than 2,000 of them to Niger so far, where they are being processed for resettlement in other countries.
    Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.”

  7. “It is based on the Kampala Convention, a 2009 African Union treaty that establishes guiding principles for protection of internally displaced persons (IDPs).
    Other African countries have ratified the Kampala Convention, but not incorporated it into national law, according to the U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR).”

    Big queston Why have other African countries not incorporated the Kampala Convention wich is a 2009 African Union Treaty into national law ?? Who is responsble for incorporating this into national law – One really questions the uncaring attitude of those african countries who have not incorporated this Convention into Law surely if the SADC region should ensure that the countries in the SADC region would have this law incorporated? or it is the norm that is being left to individual countries to ratify the Convention?

  8. 10th December 2018 UN Human RIGHTS daY
    It is the 70th Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights
    #StandUp4HumanRights

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all.
    Human rights are relevant to all of us, every day.
    Our shared humanity is rooted in these universal values.
    Equality, justice and freedom prevent violence and sustain peace.
    Whenever and wherever humanity’s values are abandoned, we all are at greater risk.
    We need to stand up for our rights and those of others.”
    SADC need to take a more stance on Human Rights in the REGION among other issues they seem to avoid issues like this when it is a Universal Declaration ???

  9. The Media also must play its part in highlighting the plight of Refugees and human rights in the Region if SADC will not take the lead as it looks like the case it never speaks about the two when it should The Media and other can change the region for the BETTER and the WELLBEING of all the CITIZENS IN THE REGION to observe days like these.

    ” Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home — so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. […] Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.” — Eleanor Roosevelt

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70
    Let’s stand up for equality, justice and human dignity

    Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10 December – the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted, in 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This year, Human Rights Day marks the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a milestone document that proclaimed the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being — regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. It is the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages.”

    Drafted by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration sets out universal values and a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations. It establishes the equal dignity and worth of every person. Thanks to the Declaration, and States’ commitments to its principles, the dignity of millions has been uplifted and the foundation for a more just world has been laid. While its promise is yet to be fully realized, the very fact that it has stood the test of time is testament to the enduring universality of its perennial values of equality, justice and human dignity.

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all. The principles enshrined in the Declaration are as relevant today as they were in 1948. We need to stand up for our own rights and those of others. We can take action in our own daily lives, to uphold the rights that protect us all and thereby promote the kinship of all human beings.

    #StandUp4HumanRights

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all.
    Human rights are relevant to all of us, every day.
    Our shared humanity is rooted in these universal values.
    Equality, justice and freedom prevent violence and sustain peace.
    Whenever and wherever humanity’s values are abandoned, we all are at greater risk.
    We need to stand up for our rights and those of others.

  10. The Media also must play its part in highlighting the plight of Refugees and human rights abuses in the Region if SADC will not take the lead as it looks like the case it never speaks about the two when it should The Media and others for example Civil Society and Human Rights Organisation change the region for the BETTER and the WELLBEING of all the CITIZENS IN THE REGION to observe days like these.

    Notably the SADC does not have a Tribunal Court while the countries in East Africa have a Court In Europe too the European Union has a Court it looks that SADC is lagging behind in many areas

  11. In some countries on the continent there are torture houses and these should be abolished this is not the right way for a country in the 21st Century

  12. ” News / Morocco- 9 hours ago

    UN members adopt global migration pact

    Leaders from 164 countries agree UN migration accord spurned by the United States and several other countries.
    by Faras Ghani
    9 hours ago

    UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres Guterres called the compact a ‘road map to prevent suffering and chaos’ aimed to benefit everyone [Jon Nazca/Reuters]UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres Guterres called the compact a ‘road map to prevent suffering and chaos’ aimed to benefit everyone [Jon Nazca/Reuters]more on Migrants

    Marrakech, Morocco – Leaders from 164 countries have agreed to a global pact that sets in action a plan “to prevent suffering and chaos” for global migration despite opposition and several withdrawals, including from the United States.

    The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) was agreed upon on Monday at an intergovernmental conference in Marrakech, Morocco.

    A non-binding agreement, the GCM aims to better manage migration at local, national, regional and global levels, including reducing the risks and vulnerabilities the migrants or refugees face at different stages of their journey.

    “Migration is a natural phenomenon,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said. “It happens all the time all over the world. If it happens legally, it’s a good thing.”

    The pact had been approved in July by all 193 member nations except the US, which backed out last year.

    In addition, Australia, Austria, Latvia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Chile, Dominican Republic, Poland and Slovakia refused to attend the summit and sign the accord.

    Meanwhile, Bulgaria, Estonia, Italy, Israel, Slovenia and Switzerland are still undecided on whether to agree to the new pact.

    “This moment is the inspiring product of dedicated and painstaking efforts,” said Antonio Guterres, the UN secretary-general, at the opening of the conference on Monday.

    “Migration has always been with us. But in a world where it is ever more inevitable and necessary, it should be well managed and safe, not irregular and dangerous.

    “National policies are far more likely to succeed with international cooperation.”
    Increasing migration numbers

    There were 258 million international migrants in the world last year, increasing almost 50 percent since 2000, according to the UN.

    The number of migrants, representing 3.4 percent of the world’s population, is increasing faster than the global population, driven by economic prosperity, inequality, violence, conflict and climate change.

    Around 80 percent of the world’s migrants move between countries in a safe and orderly fashion. But more than 60,000 people have died on the move since the year 2000, according to the UN.

    In 2018 alone, more than 3,300 people have “died or gone missing in the process of migration towards an international destination”, says the International Organization for Migration (IOM).

    Even in transit countries, or the country of destination, racism, discrimination and human-rights violations are continuously reported.”