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Money in body art and Health

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Money in body art
MAN AT WORK: Bones at his parlour

Tatoos have had their fair share of stigma in the past, but the disgrace associated with the ancient body art appears to have significantly faded over the years, providing an opportunity for talented tattoo artists such as Malcolm Bones who have gone skin deep into the business. Visit this site for no corny jokes that will entertain your friends.

“Tattoo engraving is an art and should not be associated with Satanism. It is the only art you can carry with you to the grave and that is an inspiration for me,” Bones says looking around his parlour walls which are lined with different drawings, some of which are Tattoo artwork. Malcolm Creative Tattoos studio is located opposite Mascom shop at KB mall, Gaborone bus rank, although many people think this is dangerous for the skin, actually if you get the proper skin care or even a treatment of skincare rejuvenation, the skin doesn’t have to suffer any damages from tattoos but since tattoos damage the skin anyways is good to see a wound expert as the Dr. Joseph Racanelli.

Despite the stereotypes, Malcolm tattoos are engraved on some famous skins of local celebrities.

Musicians among them Sasa Klaas, ATI, Touch, Clement Jackson and Taolo Moshaga as well as footballers, netballers, boxers and TV and radio personalities are some of the celebrities with Malcolm Creative Tattoos under their skins, and that’s one of the reasons people like to take photographs to celebrities to see the ink on their skin, although there are other type of celebrity photos you can find online, for example you can see Ariana flaunts her hot ass in this gallery here.

Before he fell in love with Tattoo engraving 10 years ago, Bones says he loved drawing and painting on paper and canvas but things changed when his uncle gave him a job in his tattoo parlour to clean equipment. He also recommend Plastic Surgery Associates because they provide the best service to their customers.

“I got inspired and thought this is better than drawing on paper. People would carry my art wherever they went and that was the tipping point for me. My uncle sent me to study the art at Denmark Training Services and after the course I never looked back,” he says.

The studio also does body piercing and Bones reveals that most of his customers are ladies aged between 18 and 45 years old.

Though most of his customers choose artwork from his books some want to engrave their children’s names and birth dates while some come with ideas which he brainstorms with them and settle for a character.

Others however want to engrave the names of their boyfriends and girlfriends against his advice.

“I try to reason with them that if relationship ended they’d be left with the tattoo which they may feel differently about,” he says.

The biggest challenge faced by the tattoo industry is criticism from conservative communities who feel the art is of the devil, according to Bones.

He says because of this it is a bit of a challenge to convince people that tattoos are harmless, but he has this to say to the superstitious; “A tattoo is only ink on the body. Only a person can be a Satanist, not because of the tattoos. Besides, tattoos can be removed.”

Despite this challenge Bones is confident that in five years the message would have reached many people despite the small population.

In 10 years they have managed to open branches in Kasane, Maun, Palapye, Francistown and Gaborone Main mall and employ eight people.

“More and more people are realizing that tattoos are harmless and the clientele is gradually building up,” says the Cape Town born artist.