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FCC takes blame for tender gaffe

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Francistown City Clerk, Lebuile Israel has revealed that those wishing to do maintenance works for three primary schools in the city will have to re-tender.

According to Israel, the decision was taken after the council realised that their system had failed the tendering process for work at Mahube, Nyangabwe and Pelotshwaane Primary schools.

The tender documents were supposed to be submitted on Tuesday; but the process was nullified after contractors, who could not catch the 9 a.m deadline, blamed the council for their woes.

“We realised that our systems failed us and we have taken responsibility. That is why we have decided to re-tender,” he said, adding that the council will as part of the deal, give out tender documents for free.

The contractors, some of whom had been queuing for more than an hour to present their tender papers, felt hard done-by when the doors were closed at the deadline time, blaming the local authorities for contributing to their lateness.

Many said they could have submitted their papers well in time, had council workers done their work more diligently.

“The council should have looked at their part in this mess, before turning us away. After the tendering process was opened, we could not get the tender documents for about five days because the photocopier was not working. After getting the papers, we realised that some pages were missing and had to go back and get the missing pages. This took a lot of time and contributed to this delay” said Sonnyboy Sikuku of Bidco Enterprises in Tutume.

For his part; Kaisara Nfila of Kayzet Holdings, who travelled all the way from Gaborone said the whole process had cost the contractors much more than the P2340.00 they had paid to process the tender documents.

“We have to pay for transport, food and accommodation, as most of us are from out of town. This is not good for business and the authorities should be more careful and considerate in their dealings with us. This is killing our business,” he said echoing the concern of many of his construction colleagues.